Resize Window Using GLFW3

When porting our game from mobile to desktop we wanted to add a few desktop specific interface enhancements. Things like using the keyboard, mouse, or managing the Window. By default games are setup to run full screen instead of within a window on desktop platforms, but since our game is pixel art full screen is a bit large on modern 24″+ monitors. So we’re sticking with running inside a window for now.

Ideally we’d allow players to resize the window. In order to support resizing a running scene we would need support to dynamically update every single UI element. Each scene or menu does size, scale, and position UI widgets on the current device (or now window) size, so we will allow changing resolution from a menu and then we will just reload that menu with replaceScene() after the changing the window frame size. We could build in support for this and attempt to unify the changes into a base class or small set of resize methods, but it would be better done at the first design and creation phase of a game’s development.

/// glview - the cocos2d-x platform OpenGL view reference 
/// frameSize - the desired window size
void OptionsResolutionMenu::static_changeResolution(GLViewImpl* glview, Size frameSize)
    auto glfwindow = glview->getWindow();
    auto fsize = glview->getFrameSize();
    auto screenSize = glview->getMonitorSize();
    int sw = screenSize.width > 0 ? (int)screenSize.width : 800;
    int sh = screenSize.height > 0 ? (int)screenSize.height : 480;
    // win position
    int winx = 0, winy = 0;
    glfwGetWindowPos(glfwindow, &winx, &winy);

    Rect viewport = glview->getViewPortRect();
    Vec2 viewcenter = Vec2(viewport.getMidX(), viewport.getMidY());

    // update the cocos2d view frame
    glview->setFrameSize(frameSize.width, frameSize.height);

    int x = int(sw - frameSize.width)/2;
    int y = int(sh - frameSize.height)/2;
    glfwSetWindowPos(glfwindow, x, y);
// call method with desired size (we get this from user options menu)
float resWidth = 800;
float resHeight = 600; 
OptionsResolutionMenu::static_changeResolution(glviewImpl, Size(resWidth, resHeight));
GameManager::getInstance()->runSceneWithID(kSceneOptionsResolution, 0);


Adding OS X Menu Bar with cocos2d-x 3.3

[todo: convert into a gist, and cleanup post]

I’ll post discussion topics here discussing adding or changing the Menu, but I found out adding MainMenu.xib didn’t work correctly as I have thought during the discussions over on the forum.

Looking into where the menu is created I found out that GLFW3 actually creates its own default menu with only two Menus services(App menu) and Window. The code where it sets this menu up is found in cocoa_window.m over on github.

Once I figured this out I had to investigate how to edit the app or window menu. Looking over the window code, and searching through the various header files from within XCode I was able to add an item to the Window menu.

Update 2015-01-17: I’ve posted up an example project using cocos2d-x 3.3

void STDeviceMac::addMainMenu(GLViewImpl* glview)
NSWindow * appWindow = (NSWindow )glfwGetCocoaWindow(glview->getWindow());
// make your obj-c calls here
menu = [NSApp windowsMenu];
NSMenuItem* menuItem = [[NSMenuItem alloc] initWithTitle:@"Check for Updates"
[menuItem setTarget:[SUUpdater sharedUpdater]];
[menu addItem:menuItem];
NSMenuItem* menuItem = [[NSMenuItem alloc] initWithTitle:@"Steve's Test"
[menuItem setTarget:_deviceImpl];
[menu addItem:menuItem];


Update Your .App With Sparkle

Sparkle is a framework many OSX apps use in order to allow easy updating, automatically if desired. By default it effectively downloads the latest version of the .app package, checks authenticity with certificates, and finally replaces the previous .app with the newly downloaded package.

You can check out the project and download the lastest version from the projects website.

Then you’ll find the documentation to get the basic setup instructions over on github.

It does take a little more work to integrate than some other frameworks, but then this one is doing quite a bit more than just adding a library and some header files. It involves copying the framework into the app, adding a copy build phase, modifying the main window .xib, configuring the appcast (which is an RSS feed), and finally testing everything out. The documentation is good, but the lack of screenshots sort of fits. I’m sure I’ll run into issues so I’ll post them here as they occur.

Cocos2d-x uses GLFW3 for all of it’s platform window creation needs and by default creates its own menu so I had to add an extra menu item by calling into an Objective-C++ platform specific implementation.


Microsoft Band Pairing Issues

Last night after a work out the Microsoft Health App wouldn’t find my band. There was an issue with bluetooth pairing so I tried disconnecting, reconnecting, and re-pairing, but the app still could not find it.

Some one else had the same problem and was able to fix it by reconnecting until two bluetooth devices connected. I tried to follow his advice, but mistakenly shrugged off a warning and I was left with a Band that would no longer sync until a factory reset completed.

I found out too late, before I unregistered, that you can also pair the band to the desktop on Windows or the Mac App Store. I bet I would have been able to sync up and upload the workouts that I lost.

For those few who have a band Microsoft recently pushed out its first update for the band itself, only available when using one of the mobile app.